Restaurants (2019)

I remember Don recommending Cafe 8 1/2 (or something like that), an Italian restaurant in town. They closed before I ever got to try there, but I believe the owner opened a new place called Soffritto on Pauahi Street. Whether the owner is the same, I went to Soffritto’s recently. In addition to Italian food, they also serve Cajun food there. The pictures I saw on yelp made me want to check out the place. Unfortunately, they’re only open for lunch on weekdays. (They were open Saturday nights, and we tried to go recently, but they were closed. When I asked the owner about this, he said he no longer opens on Saturday. He said he’s getting a wood fire oven, though and will open on Saturday evenings in the near future.) I was on vacation so I recently went down for lunch. The verdict? I really liked this place. We tried a bunch of things–the gumbo and rice, shrimp etouffee and rice, the beef stroganoff with macaroni, and the jambalaya. The stroganoff and jamabalaya were fine, but I really liked the gumbo and etouffee. I want to go back!

17 thoughts on “Restaurants (2019)

  1. At Grace’s birthday dinner, we were talking a little about restaurant bathrooms, and I mentioned how Chinese restaurants always seem to have bad bathrooms, and how it makes me question how well the food is taken care of.

    Reid suggested an alternate theory: that with Chinese restaurants, there’s an unspoken agreement between customers and restaurant. We judge the restaurant by the food and the food only.

    It makes sense, given other considerations in Chinese restaurants (such as customer service). I have this coworker whose parents own a well-known Chinese restaurant (I’ll tell you in private if you want). My coworker says she totally understands my displeasure with the restrooms in these restaurants (she’s a bit of a priss herself about these things). Then she said her mom says, “I’m not selling you a bathroom break. I’m selling you a meal.”

    So there you go. Reid was right and I don’t want to eat at Chinese restaurants anymore.

    Oh, my friend added a corollary: Her mom says, “I’m not selling you a smile. I’m selling you a meal.”

    1. You really don’t want to eat at Chinese restaurants anymore or were you being facetious?

      (Man, I’m surprised we only had one post for this thread this year.)

    2. I was telling your wife a couple of months ago that one of the side effects of one of my medications is the sudden, urgent need to go to the bathroom. It’s not as bad now (my body’s gotten used to it and my doctor prescribed me a time-release version of the same drug that’s easier on my insides), but it was pretty rough for a year or so. This means that for a certain time period (it was kind of restricted to the first X hours after I took the pills) I was always aware of how close I was to an acceptable bathroom.

      So yeah. Even though this awareness is not as critical to my everyday life, it’s still with me, and although I wouldn’t refuse to go to a Chinese restaurant if that’s where my friends were going, if I have other options with better restrooms, to heck with the Chinese restaurants and their terrible bathrooms.

      It’s not just Chinese restaurants. I’ve chosen McD’s over Zippy’s in my hood because the Zippy’s (Kalihi, not Kapalama) restroom is fricking insulting to me as a customer. I can’t believe Zippy’s thinks I deserve to be treated this way, to an utter (and literal) craphole of a bathroom.

      So, no. Not facetious at all. Feces-ious, definitely.

      1. I was telling your wife a couple of months ago that one of the side effects of one of my medications is the sudden, urgent need to go to the bathroom.

        I didn’t realize this–and I get it now.

        So, no. Not facetious at all. Feces-ious, definitely.

        Hahaha.

  2. I resist bandwagons, especially when they cause lines to go out the door in national chain restaurants, but I was out for a long walk one afternoon and saw there was enough seating in Raising Cane’s to give it a shot.

    It’s chicken fingers and fries, basically, and if there was anything on the menu besides fingers and fries combos, I don’t remember what they were. I got a four-piece combo (it comes with a drink) and it was pretty dang good.

    I wouldn’t get excited about chicken fingers, but these are good. Lean, tender breast meat, nicely deep fried. The fries are crinkle-cuts, which would normally get me amped but these are a little on the thin side, so not as potatoey as I like. If the fries were a bit thicker I’d make it a point to come here again. As it is, I’ll probably only come again if in a similar situation: happen to be nearby and it’s not crowded.

    The cole slaw is good but honestly not better than KFC’s. The Cane’s sauce (or whatever it’s called) goes well with the fries, which is why I paid fifty cents or so for a second sauce (the combo comes with one). The chicken was good enough without sauce.

    1. I have zero interest in this place, but the following makes me a little interested–“…it was pretty dang good.

      I wouldn’t get excited about chicken fingers, but these are good.”

    2. It really depends on how you feel about chicken. People say chicken breasts are boring, but I really like them. I’ll eat them plain, without any seasoning even. I like chicken to taste like chicken, and these do.

      1. I like chicken, and I really like almost any type of friend chicken. If their chicken fingers are essentially equivalent to a good chicken katsu I might be more open to them. At the same time, I would prefer eating them plate lunch style.

  3. I heard that Raising Cane’s chicken is underseasonedj (on purpose), so if you don’t like their dipping sauce you won’t like their meal.

    Mitchell,

    How was the Texas toast? Not memorable, I guess.

    Just had Meg’s Chicken Katsu today, and I didn’t care for it. It’s crispy and pretty juicy, but it didn’t really have much taste. The breading may have had a slight burnt taste, too. Much like Raising Canes I guess, you got to eat it with the sauce.

  4. I wonder if that’s why I liked it. I like the taste of chicken with no seasoning. Sometimes I get a whole tray of chicken breasts from Costco and throw them all in the slow-cooker with a few tablespoons of water and (I guess) steam them. Then throw them in a large container in the fridge, and eat a chicken breast (or two) for breakfast every day for a week. Chicken is good — it doesn’t need a lot of seasoning.

    Oh yeah the combo comes with a slice of Texas Toast, whatever that is. It was a lot like a Liliha Bakery butter roll — super buttery but not especially tasty. A little bit of nuclear jelly and I might have had more than the one bite I had. I saved it for last and I was kinda carbed out already.

  5. Pho Tri
    This is that spot on the corner of Beretania and Kalakaua, across the Mormon temple. The entrance is on Kalakaua.

    This is easily my favorite pho on the island (so far). I’m told the non-pho items on the menu are also very good, but I doubt I’ll ever find out. The broth here is amazing, not the tasty but insipid broth I usually get other places. I’m not saying it’s as complex as a good bowl of soup, but there’s a lot more flavor here than I’m used to in a pho.

    There’s not a lot more to say about it; I mean, it’s pho, and like a lot of places now, there are a lot of varieties for meat. I’m not fond of the fatty brisket (that’s what it’s called on the menu) but the other meats I’ve had were good.

    If you go on Saturday and dine in, you get a second bowl for half price. Which is crazy if you ask me: who can eat two bowls of pho?

    Oh, you know what? I did try something else on the menu. Spring rolls and Vietnamese iced coffee. The spring rolls are good. The iced coffee is great. It seems when I’m there that the Thai iced tea is more popular, and I may give that a try one of these days.

    If you like pho, I can’t imagine your not liking this pho. I’m supposed to go with coworkers again in two weeks, but I may not be able to wait that long.

    1. For what it’s worth, one or two Vietnamese people I know mentioned this place when I asked which place had the best pho.

      The broth here is amazing, not the tasty but insipid broth I usually get other places. I’m not saying it’s as complex as a good bowl of soup, but there’s a lot more flavor here than I’m used to in a pho.

      I have the same impression of the broth from pho. Have you tried the pho at Pig and the Lady? Their pho is really flavorful, and I’m wondering how it compares.

      If you go on Saturday and dine in, you get a second bowl for half price. Which is crazy if you ask me: who can eat two bowls of pho?

      Wait, so one person has to eat two bowls? If two people come in the bowl for the second person won’t be half off?

      In any event, I want to try this place now.

      1. Oh yeah I had (I think) a vegetable pho at Pig and the Lady and it was good but I have to put that in a separate category.

        And of course one person doesn’t have to eat two bowls. I was making a stupid joke about how I almost always dine alone.

        1. You’re putting PatL in a separate category because it’s too upscale?

          I was making a stupid joke about how I almost always dine alone.

          Went totally over my head. Half off the second bowl is definitely appealing.

    2. We go here once in a while as well. The pho meat is good (ie: soft and tasty) and the broth is good. Of course we do the Saturday thing, but it can get crowded on Saturdays. The pho is probably one of the cheapest. It never used to be, but as pho prices have gone up all over, this one hasn’t. It’s still under $10, and it’s one of the few and maybe only that I know of outside of Chinatown.

      Mitchell,

      Have you tried Saigon on Kapiolani in the same lot as MW? I like their soup better, but it cost $13 (maybe even a little more).

      1. It’s been on my list for a while but not yet! I always think I should put on long pants and a nice shirt before I go there.

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