5 thoughts on “Math Corner

  1. Here’s a real problem I recently faced. I played a game with a group of kids that required three groups. I had 56 kids. Here’s the breakdown of each group:

    A: 20
    B: 26
    C: 10

    I wanted to every participants to be in each group above, at least once. (I could do the activity in three rounds.) What’s the most efficient and least confusing way to go about this?

      1. Sorry, I wasn’t clear; let me try again (although I’m not promising this will be clearer). I was going to play a game three times or rounds. I’m asking how I can rotate the participants into new groups so that each participants gets to play the game in A, B, and C groups. For example,

        Round 1
        A: 20
        B: 26
        C: 10

        In round 2, I could move the 20 from A into group B, and 6 from group C. Now, in Round 2, group B would have an entirely new group of participants.

        I could then move 20 from Group B from Round 1 to Group A (for Round 2), and 6 to Group C (for Round 2).

        And then I would to shift around the participants again for Round 3. See what I’m saying?

      2. If the maximum number of people in group C is 10, you can’t do it in three rounds because you have 56 people. Are you allowed to take as many rounds as necessary to ensure everyone gets to be in each group?

        1. If the maximum number of people in group C is 10, you can’t do it in three rounds because you have 56 people.

          You mean, you would need six rounds? I think that would be too many….I guess I was OK if not everyone got to be in group C, which I didn’t explain.

          I also forgot to specify that I wanted the easiest way to break up the groups and transition to the next rounds (or maybe I conveyed that). I did this on the fly, and I drew up table, and tried show how I could move people around into different groups for subsequent rounds. It was a mess.

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